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Posted by
Steph Coulton
December 4th, 2012

Being thrown into the Red C: My first four months at an advertising agency

by Steph Coulton

Cinemagram LogoAny student looking for a placement will tell you how hard it is. It’s difficult finding time to fill out application forms around assignments, deadlines, and most importantly round your social life – a definite challenge even for the most organised person. You have to be fully committed to the search and really invest time into researching each role and company before you can answer questions, ultimately you have to prove you can jump through hoops in just a couple of pages of A4. (My favourite application question “If you were a biscuit, what biscuit would you be?”.

Selling yourself in.

If you are lucky enough it’s onto the next stage of the process- interviews! Interviews are equally as hard, especially when you are up against other students who study similar degrees. I learnt quickly that you had to really make yourself stand out from other candidates in order to get the job. I did this by highlighting my extensive work experience and extracurricular activities and relating these back to the role. I feel that these areas really helped me in being successful with my application at Red C. An interview is your only opportunity to sell yourself, make a good impression, and persuade why the company to invest in you.

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Posted by
Susie Whitby
November 5th, 2012

Did the Olympics 2012 branding laws go too far?

by Susie Whitby

Knitted Olympic dollIt’s arrival was hailed as an opportunity to generate tourism and increase economic activity across the UK, so there was no doubt that London 2012 was a once in a lifetime opportunity for businesses to rake in the benefits, so why did it end up causing no end of grief for businesses across the UK?

With the likes of Adidas and Coca-Cola paying copious amounts of money for the privilege of becoming London 2012 official partners, the IOC (International Olympics Committee) created branding laws in order to preserve the exclusivity of these world renowned sponsors. The sole aim of this committee was to ensure no one was using the Olympics brand unless they had paid huge amounts of money for the privilege. Not only had the IOC created a protective layer around the word Olympics, the Olympic symbols and the Games’ mottoes, they also created a legislation against unauthorised association, banning non-sponsors from using images or wording that may suggest a close link to the Games, preventing the unauthorised use of words such as ‘London’, ‘London Twenty Twelve’, ‘Gold’, ‘Silver’, ‘Bronze’ and, most ludicrously, ‘Summer.’ Dubbed by critics as the ‘Brand Police’, the IOC then had the authority to impose whopping great fines of up to £20,000 on anyone that engaged in such activities.

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Posted by
Katie Shoard
October 16th, 2012

The Weird Science of advertising agency self-promotion

by Katie Shoard

Weird Science front coverAdvertising agency self-promotion is a wily old beast. Being given carte blanche for a piece of new business dm may seem like a creatives’ dream, but anyone who’s ever had a crack at the perennial Christmas card brief knows that in order to give your agency standout, whatever you come up, no matter how pretty, needs to have some really solid thinking behind it.

And in our case, an injection of something a little bit weirder.

 

Of course, when I said ‘carte blanche’ I actually was referring to the new double-dip recession version which can be defined roughly as thus: ‘Do what you like, but don’t take the mick’. Fair enough. Blowing the cash for our Christmas party six months before the event wasn’t going to make us popular anyway, so the wooing of potential clients with a personalised Tom-Jones-a-gram was (sadly) out of the question.

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Posted by
Andrew Campbell
June 6th, 2012

How brands went jubilee crazy this summer

by Andrew Campbell

union jack flagBeen to the shops lately? Take a trip and you’ll notice that things aren’t quite as you’d expect them to be. Lots and lots of famous brands have gone all patriotic on us, casting aside their brand guidelines in honour of Queen Elizabeth’s Diamond Jubilee.

From product packaging being splashed with old Blighty’s red, white and blue to complete product name changes, it seems every brand is jumping on the jubilee bandwagon this summer. The burning question is, who’s done Britain proud and tied their brand to this very special occasion with diligence and honour and who has the potential of being sent to The Tower? Here’s a look at some of the best and worst cases.

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Posted by
Andrew Campbell
April 24th, 2012

When accidental Brand exposure pays off!

by Andrew Campbell

Tide DetergentEver heard of Tide Detergent? American brand, big orange container, pretty pricey… Me neither. That is, until a few weeks ago when news stories exploded all over the web about the product being stolen from stores across America.

Yes, you read that right. Bizarrely, rather than steal cars, cash registers or wallets, many thieves are stealing Tide Detergent and then selling the stuff on the black market.

You’re probably scratching your head thinking, “why Tide?” Well, according to the authorities, there are several reasons: Tide is instantly recognisable due to its bright orange bottle, it’s one of the most expensive brands of laundry detergent and it doesn’t have serial numbers, so it can’t be tracked.

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Posted by
Miriam Eastwood
March 19th, 2012

An evening with John Hegarty

by Miriam Eastwood

Hegarty on advertising bookMy evening with John Hegarty started one cold November evening in the centre of Manchester and ended on the snowy slopes of Saas Fee in early Feb. What I thought would be a one night only thing snowballed into early morning meetings, train journeys, evenings on the sofa and even a quick 10 minutes over lunch…..

On that late Thursday evening back in November, Julian Gratton, Managing and Creative Director of Red C, had double booked himself with a Pearl Jam gig or Bradford City game…  some unmissable ‘life or death’ type event. The only problem was he had purchased much-sought after tickets to an ‘Evening with John Hegarty’ held in Manchester’s art museum. After much agency squabbling I got the available ticket and accompanied our Head of Creative to Hegarty’s promotional talk about his newly released book, ‘Turning Intelligence into Magic’.

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Posted by
Emma Beagrie
March 16th, 2012

Mum’s the word: Why marketing to mums is big business

by Emma Beagrie

Emma and HollyTwelve months ago I became a mum for the first time. Little did I know that I was also going to become a marketers dream… and discover a whole new marketing world of marketing to mums!

From the moment you discover you are pregnant, an entire new world opens up that you never previously knew existed. There are new areas of department stores that you have never ventured into and websites you have never visited.  And you suddenly get inundated with freebies – lots and lots of them. At no other time in your life do you have brands actually wanting to give you something for nothing!

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Posted by
Rachael Taylor
January 23rd, 2012

Daily Deal Sites: Making a deal with the devil?

by Rachael Taylor

Daily Deals Blog PostI have a real love/hate relationship with those emails that pop into my inbox before I even open my eyes in the morning, tempting me to must-buy experiences, weekends away and 10 vibroplate sessions.  These emails may appear harmless, but the promise of self-improvement and gourmet food just proves too hard to resist for me!  And such is the reason for Groupon’s success…

The name Groupon comes from the term “group” and was developed by now CEO, Andrew Mason in 2008. It grew out of a website called “The Point”, where you can start a campaign and ask people to participate and deliver action because of the strength in numbers. Just as the campaigns need a ‘tipping point’ of people to become viable, Groupon needs a certain number of buyers to make the deals valid.  This collective buying gives us the access to the deals which just seem too good to be true.

To date Groupon serves 500 markets and 44 countries.

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Posted by
Katie Shoard
January 6th, 2012

Why bad spelling spells bad news for business advertising

by Katie Shoard

Bad Spelling AdvertisingForeign restaurants are an absolute goldmine for bad spelling in their advertising. Most of us have enjoyed a giggle at the ‘innovative’ dishes that pop up on menus in exotic climes… like the ‘friend eggs and tose’ I had for breakfast in Thailand, for example. Delicious it was too.

In this context, typos are funny, endearing and completely forgivable; they don’t negatively affect your opinion of the restaurant or the quality of the service you expect to receive. But what about when you visit a new business online? If you’ve got no prior knowledge of the company, how do you feel if you open their website and it’s full of spelling mistakes and bad grammar? Bet you’d be more suspicious than I was tucking into my friend eggs… Read more…

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Posted by
Daisy Rowan
November 10th, 2011

Three months into my placement at an advertising agency!

by Daisy Rowan

Pot NoodleSo here we are, three months in to my placement at an advertising agency, and Red C has had me unleashed upon them without the safety net of my predecessor Anna Chan around to guide me. Though whilst I’m holding my breath and wishing myself luck, I think I’m going to be alright.

Here’s why:

1. The people I’m working with are ace. They are funny, clever and helpful

2. Holiday treats, birthday treats, leaving treats…there’s always some kind of sweet treat on offer, not to mention the decent coffee. Suddenly 7am starts don’t seem so bad

3. It’s a bit of a cliché but I can honestly say I’m learning something new thing every day

I remember when I first started searching for a placement last year and thinking that just getting one was what counted. Now I realise actually just how important getting the right one was. And I certainly found that at Red C.

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